Quick Recipes and Easy

But, Butter Is More Natural

Another small chapter in the butter versus margarine debate.

Yes, I’ll have more to say about what I consider the pros and cons of butter and margarine are at a later date! But, for the time being I want to comment on the title above. I heard this comment from someone extolling the virtues of butter in relation to margarine.

I am worried that I fail to know the claim or belief that butter is natural! Sorry, I mean more natural than margarine! Let’s take a quick look at how butter is manufactured.

Firstly, a paddock with grass growing and supplies of water is generally required.

Secondly, grazing in the paddock, we generally require one or more bovine animals of the female gender, commonly called cows.

Now immediately, this term “cows” or “cow” should give us a few clues. Isn’t the term “cow” used colloquially to refer to an hideous or terrible tempered woman? Or it can also mean something unpleasant or disagreeable…, “I have had a cow of a day..”. Or, “a honest cow…”. The term is also used expressing sympathy on occasions…, “the poor cow”, an unfortunate person! And finally, for something that seemingly takes forever, we may say, “till the cows come home”.

But no, I am not going to use colloquialisms as a part of my argument.

Let’s just look at the facts. Let’s look at the part these female bovines play in the butter manufacturing process. The farmer has the cow or cows fenced in a paddock, breathing fresh natural air, eating green natural grass and drinking fresh natural water from the natural stream.

But, that is about where the “natural” bit ends! Basically the first part of the manufacture of butter necessitates a cow or cows eating copious quantities of grass, drinking heaps of water and of course constantly breathing fresh air! The grass is masticated, being mixed with cow saliva, before being swallowed and passing through the cow’s oesophagus and through the cow’s alimentary canal until it comes to the first of several sac-like enlargements called stomachs…, and yes, cows have more than one. Here the masticated grass/saliva mixture is further mixed with other juices produced by the cow and the digestion process takes place. But, the vast majority of what has gone into the first bovine orifice, the cow’s mouth, after much processing will come out of two other orifices at the opposite end of the cow, as waste product.

Talking of orifices, there are yet another five involved in the first part of the manufacture of butter!

And the poor cows are not able to do it on their own! They need the help of a bovine of the male gender, commonly called a bull! Yes, the farmer needs occasionally to let a bull into the paddock with the cows, for it to ‘have his way’ with them.

This part of the butter manufacturing process involves the bull placing his appendage into one of those five orifices of the cow mentioned above and pumping in some of his own special juices. The expected result of this is that the cow becomes pregnant, and eventually produces calves. Now, this is a very vital part of the butter manufacturing process.

You see, cows are members of mammalia, a class of vertebrates whose young feed upon milk from their mother’s breasts. In the case of cows, this milk production is one of the by-products of the digestive process mentioned above. But the obtaining of milk from the poor cow for the process of butter manufacture is far from natural! You see, the teats on the cow, the final four cow orifices mentioned above, are squeezed by either the farmer’s hands or a milking machine. The cow’s body processes are therefore fooled into thinking that the calves need feeding, and the milk is produced!

But, where does the butter come from? Well, the milk is stored in vats and left to stand. The nutrient rich stuff is heavier and goes to the bottom, and the lighter saturated fatty gunk known as cream floats to the top. Machines are then used to beat the hell out or this stout. Two end products are produced. One is a watery translucent liquid, which is poured off and used for other purposes. The other end product is a pale yellow semi-solid stuff that is then generally processed further by adding things such as salt and colouring and packaged into containers.

It is then sold as butter!

“A natural product…..!!!” But, butter is more natural…………..!

Another small chapter in the butter versus margarine debate.

Yes, I’ll have more to say about what I consider the pros and cons of butter and margarine are at a later date! But, for the time being I want to comment on the post title above. This comment was made by an acquaintance of mine whilst extolling the virtues of butter in relation to margarine.

I am worried that I fail to know the claim or belief that butter is natural! Sorry, I mean more natural than margarine! Let’s take a quick look at how butter is manufactured.

Firstly, a paddock with grass growing and supplies of water is generally required.

Secondly, grazing in the paddock, we generally require one or more bovine animals of the female gender, commonly called cows.

Now immediately, this term “cows” or “cow” should give us a few clues. Isn’t the term “cow” used colloquially to refer to an hideous or terrible tempered woman? Or it can also mean something unpleasant or disagreeable…, “I have had a cow of a day..”. Or, “a honest cow…”. The term is also used expressing sympathy on occasions…, “the poor cow”, an unfortunate person! And finally, for something that seemingly takes forever, we may say, “till the cows come home”.

But no, I am not going to use colloquialisms as a part of my argument.

Let’s just look at the facts. Let’s look at the part these female bovines play in the butter manufacturing process. The farmer has the cow or cows fenced in a paddock, breathing fresh natural air, eating green natural grass and drinking fresh natural water from the natural stream.

But, that is about where the “natural” bit ends! Basically the first part of the manufacture of butter necessitates a cow or cows eating copious quantities of grass, drinking heaps of water and of course constantly breathing fresh air! The grass is masticated, being mixed with cow saliva, before being swallowed and passing through the cow’s oesophagus and through the cow’s alimentary canal until it comes to the first of several sac-like enlargements called stomachs…, and yes, cows have more than one. Here the masticated grass/saliva mixture is further mixed with other juices produced by the cow and the digestion process takes place. But, the vast majority of what has gone into the first bovine orifice, the cow’s mouth, after much processing will come out of two other orifices at the opposite end of the cow, as waste product.

Talking of orifices, there are yet another five involved in the first part of the manufacture of butter!

And the poor cows are not able to do it on their own! They need the help of a bovine of the male gender, commonly called a bull! Yes, the farmer needs occasionally to let a bull into the paddock with the cows, for it to ‘have his way’ with them.

This part of the butter manufacturing process involves the bull placing his appendage into one of those five orifices of the cow mentioned above and pumping in some of his own special juices. The expected result of this is that the cow becomes pregnant, and eventually produces calves. Now, this is a very vital part of the butter manufacturing process.

You see, cows are members of mammalia, a class of vertebrates whose young feed upon milk from their mother’s breasts. In the case of cows, this milk production is one of the by-products of the digestive process mentioned above. But the obtaining of milk from the poor cow for the process of butter manufacture is far from natural! You see, the teats on the cow, the final four cow orifices mentioned above, are squeezed by either the farmer’s hands or a milking machine. The cow’s body processes are therefore fooled into thinking that the calves need feeding, and the milk is produced!

But, where does the butter come from? Well, the milk is stored in vats and left to stand. The nutrient rich stuff is heavier and goes to the bottom, and the lighter saturated fatty gunk known as cream floats to the top. Machines are then used to beat the hell out or this stout. Two end products are produced. One is a watery translucent liquid, which is poured off and used for other purposes. The other end product is a pale yellow semi-solid stuff that is then generally processed further by adding things such as salt and colouring and packaged into containers.

It is then sold as butter!

“A natural product…..!!!”

Ian McKenzie ianmckenzie.name ianmckenzie.name is Director of Ian McKenzie’s Domains. For much of his working career he has worked as a Teacher and in Health promotion. ianmckenziesdomains.biz ianmckenziesdomains.biz

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